Recent Storm Damage Posts

Winter Storms and Frozen Pipes in Wayne County

11/9/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Winter Storms and Frozen Pipes in Wayne County When temperatures get too cold, sometimes pipes freeze, and if the pressure from the water expansion becomes to great, they can break.

Upon waking up and seeing the snow falling in mid November, it has become apparent that is is that time of year again. . . . 

The National Severe Storms Laboratory catagorizes a winter storm as having snow, freezing rain, or sleet.  As we are Michiganders, it is all too common for us to see any or all of these in a short period of time. 

When temperatures are frigid, and precipitation in in the forecast, that's when SERVPRO of Carleton/Maybee prepares for the flood of calls that they know are sure to come in. 

What Causes Pipes to Break?

A significant amount of winter storm damage occurs when pipes freeze and break.  When water freezes, it naturally expands, which causes pressure within the pipe, and can cause it to break.  Exposed pipes (quite often outside or under the home) are the most likely to experience this, however pipes within your home that do not have access to heat may be vulnerable as well (pipes underneath your kitchen cabinets or in your garage, for example).

How Can This Be Prevented?

  • Before temperatures reach freezing, check and make sure crawlspace vents are closed
  • Make sure exposed pipes are insulated and protected (this can be done fairly easily by wrapping them with pipe sleeves)
  • Keep the garage door closed to prevent cold air from coming in
  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to encourage warm air circulation
  • In extreme low temperatures, leave faucet (especially hot water side) on at a slow drip
  • Keep the temperature in your home above 55 degrees Fahrenheit

If you or someone you know experiences an issue with winter storm damage or frozen pipes this winter, call SERVPRO of Carleton/Maybee at (734) 299-7006 

Preparedness is Key; Tips for Monroe and Wayne County Residents

9/19/2018 (Permalink)

September is National Preparedness month, which begs the question whether or not you would know what to do if an emergency happened in your home.

Here are some helpful tips to keep you and your loved ones safe:

  • Come up with several evacuation routes out of the home and go over these routinely, especially with younger family members
  • Designate a meeting place if you get separated
  • Inspect fire extinguishers on a regular basis and know how to use them (see a below blog entitled Would You Be Prepared to find detailed instructions on how to test your fire extinguisher and know what class of fire it is intended for)
  • Ensure there are both smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors located in multiple locations in your home, and test them on a regular basis
  • Put together an emergency waterproof bag that includes, but is not limited to the following:
    • Water bottles
    • Matches and a lighter
    • Flashlight and batteries
    • A roll of toilet paper
    • Poncho
    • Cotton t-shirt (you can wrap this around your nose and mouth to help filter dangerous debris
    • Glow sticks
    • Durable rope
    • Box cutter
    • Spare house keys (clip on a whistle and Swiss army knife)
    • Non perishable food bars
    • A pair of gardening gloves
    • Duct tape
    • First aid kit
    • Toiletry necessities (medications, anti bacterial soap. . .)

      For more information on specific types of situations to prepare for, or for print out forms to help your family gather the proper information, visit ready.gov

      If you have experienced an emergency situation and need help, please contact SERVPRO of Carleton/Maybee at (734) 299-7006.

Knowing Your Weather Terminology

7/5/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Knowing Your Weather Terminology Here are a few weather terms and definitions that may make this storm season a little easier to get through.

With summer here, it is only a matter of time before we start to see some crazy Michigan weather, and that means that the meteorologist will be using terms that may be a little confusing.  Do you know the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning?  Here are a few weather terms and definitions that may make this storm season a little easier to get through.

Warning:  A warning is issued when a hazardous weather event is occurring, imminent, or likely.  A warning means weather conditions pose a threat to life or property.  People in the path of the storm need to take protective action.

Watch:  A watch is used when the risk of a hazardous weather event has increased significantly, but its occurrence, location, or timing is still uncertain.  It is intended to provide enough lead time so those who need to set their plans in motion can do so.  A watch means that hazardous weather is possible.  People should have a plan of action in case a storm threatens, and they should listen for further information and possible warnings especially when planning travel or outdoor activities.

Advisory:  An advisory is issued when a hazardous weather event is occurring, imminent, or likely.  Advisories are for less serious conditions than warnings, that cause significant inconvenience and if caution is not exercised, could lead to situations that may threaten life or property.